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Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso

Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Foto Church Santa Maria dei Miracoli at San Celso -  Churches / Religious buildings
Show an other treasure of art and history in Milan:
Milan - Churches / Religious buildings: Chiesa Santa Maria dei Miracoli presso San CelsoThe beautiful church of Santa Maria dei Miracoli is an example of Renaissance architecture in Milan and is another monument not easy to spot from the profane, being located on the back of a courtyard closed to the outside by a high wall.

The church was built in place of a chapel located next to the small church of San Celso, in the first half of the sixteenth century, following the recognition of a miracle of the Virgin Mary occurred in that chapel. The church of San Celso is still present next to the church, but normally is not open to the public.

As for the interior, the decoration was carried out in two distinct phases: the first, subsequent to 1535, reflecting the preferences and Venetian mannerist introduced during the period of Spanish rule, while the following exhibits trends typical of the counterreform expressed in 1565 by Carlo Borromeo. The first testifies a period of transition, both political and artistic: with the death of the last of the Sforza Francesco II (1535), the duchy became part of the Spanish possessions of Charles V, while from the pictorial point of view, the death of Bramantino (1530) and of Bernardino Luini (1532) highlights the exhaustion of the previous period of painting. The cultural hegemony exercised by the new rulers also required the opening of the city to the taste of Venetian painting and mannerism. The church, which for a ducal decree of 1491 enjoyed great autonomy with respect to the clergy and was ruled by a Chapter of eighteen nobles, became one of the central places for new trends and relations between the Spanish rulers and local aristocracy, as shown by visits of Charles V (1541) and Philip II (1548) during their presences in Milan. Not surprisingly, the ambulatory that runs around the chancel was decorated with a series of paintings by major artists, including Gaudenzio Ferrari, who painted 'The Baptism of Christ' (1540-41), from Brescia Moretto with its' Conversion of St. Paul '(1540-45) and Callisto Piazza, author of' Saint Jerome '(1542-1544).

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