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Liprand Tower

Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Foto Liprand Tower -  Others
Show an other treasure of art and history in Milan:
Milan - Others: Liprand TowerMostly represented styles: Romanesque

The Liprand Tower is the remains of the ancient Church of the Holy Trinity, a Romanesque church founded in 1075 by the priest Liprand in a land owned by him in the area of ​​the so-called Borgo degli Ortolani ("Greengrocers' Quarter"). Destroyed by a fire that left only the bell tower, it was rebuilt in the seventeenth century, remodeled in the nineteenth and finally torn down in 1968 to be replaced with a modern church in a different location. It was possible to save the bell tower because part of the original Romanesque church.
The "Greengrocers' Quarter" corresponded to the area currently just north of the Arena and Sempione Street and took its name from the presence of numerous cultivated fields and farms, by virtue of the abundant availability of water. Still in the nineteenth century it was a mainly rural area.
Currently the tower is located within a condominium garden, surrounded by tall trees.
The structure is typical of the Lombard Romanesque bell towers and the similarities with the bell tower of the Church of Santa Maria at San Satiro and that of the Church of Sant'Apollinare in Baggio (still to be added on this site) are evident.
The brick structure is decorated with hanging arches typical of the Romanesque style and is completed by a two-lights loggia, in recente times walled up to give greater solidity to the building. The sloping roof is well preserved.
It should be noted that there is no internal access to the upper floors, while the ground floor (which had acquired the function of service room in the demolished church) is open on three sides.

The current property (Bordiga Group) acquired the building in the early eighties from the Milanese curia and devised an enhancement plan with the name of Torre Liprando. For more information, also about the history of the church and of the site: torreliprando.it. The tower is also proposed as a location for events, especially cultural events.

If you are interested in a guided tour of this monument send an email!

Categories: Others


Via Pietro Giannone, 9, 20154 Milano MI